I think that every choice is political. When you decide that a woman can be a character of her own and not have to fall in love with the f***ing guy, that’s a political choice. When you choose that they can speak in their own language and be subtitled, that’s a political choice. I think it’s very important for us to understand that we are all — the whole world — in the same robot. It’s this f***ing planet. No matter who you are, what you like to do, whatever your race or whatever your religion, we’re all human. And I think it’s really great to make a movie that celebrates that diversity.

"Imagine; I used to have really long blonde hair, always wearing heels, lots of make-up. I had been someone who was highly feminised and had chosen to look that way, partly because I was 6ft 3in but also I was into that aesthetic. I knew it had to be stripped away. I knew this would be an important part, not just for my work but in terms of my own development, because I would be confronting elements of myself that I didn’t want to confront (…) To see yourself displayed as unattractive, large, masculine, it’s quite tough… But I know it’s just perspective. A social conditioning that causes us to view these traits in a woman in a negative way." — Gwendoline Christie

(Source: iheartgot, via stonehengeisadestructiveforce)

spooktercrunk:

abhorticulture:

thecakebar:

Surprise! Gender Reveal Cake

  • A Gender reveal party is where the parents throw a party (similar to a baby shower) to find out the gender of the baby! 
  • No one knows the sex of the baby (just the party planner/bakers know!)
  • The gender is revealed when the parents cut the cake open and the inside color of the cake/desserts reveal if the baby will be a boy or a girl! (pink is usually used for girls, blue for boys of course!)

mine was full of wasps. HUGE WASPS.

"what’s the baby’s gender?" the eager party goers ask, crowded around the cake

slowly, the knife cuts through the first piece. “wasps.” the proud parent-to-be whispers, “wasps.”

one thousand wasps are released from the gender cake.

(via inliminalspace)

nprfreshair:

"Everybody said, ‘Oh you must’ve been on drugs when you made those movies.’ No! We weren’t on drugs when we made them. I was on on drugs when I thought them up and I was on drugs when we showed them, but I was never on drugs when we made them, because it was too hard.” 

- John Waters

Waters’ new book is called Carsick. It chronicles his hitchhiking journey across the country. 

Photo by Richard Burbridge, 2008 

(via darkamiyetcomely)